ASI 2017 Convention Presentations

2017 ASI Convention Presentations

VFD and Dr. Grandin videos from the 2017 ASI Annual Meeting are available on the ASI YouTube Channel at SheepUSA1 or at www.sheepusa.org at News and Media > Video

2017 Industry Sponsors — A special Thank You to our Industry Sponsors who help to make this event the success it has become.

Thursday Genetic Stakeholders, Animal Health and PERC Meetings

NSIP vs Non-NSI Sires
Reid Redden, Ph.D., Texas A&M

Genetic Trends Over Time with Breeds on NSIP
Rusty Burgett, NSIP Program Director

Scrapie Eradication Program Update
Diane Sutton, DVM, USDA/APHIS/VS

Medically Important Antimicrobials in Animal Agriculture – Sheep
Mike Murphy DVM, JD, Ph.D., DABVT, DABT; Veterinary Medical Officer, Office of the Director, Center for Veterinary Medicine, FDA

Animal Health Committee Updates
Cindy Wolf, DVM, and Jim Logan, DVM – Animal Health Committee Co-Chairs

Research Update from the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center
Brad A. Freking, Ph.D., USDA, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Meat Animal Research Center

National Wildlife Research Center Update
Larry Clark, Ph.D.

Livestock Protection Dog Update
Julie Young, Ph.D. and Daniel Kinka

Thursday State Executives/Contacts Meeting

Tri Lamb AUS/NZ Tour
Ryan Mahoney, 2016/17 Tri Lamb Young Leader

Let’s Grow Funding and Resources
Alan Culham, Let’s Grow Coordinator

Thursday Resource Management Council Meeting

Public Lands Council
Ethan Lane, PLC Executive Director

National Grazing Lands Council Sterring Committee
Ben Lehfeldt, ASI Representative to Grazing Committee

Domestic Small Ruminants & Bighorn Sheep Respiratory Disease Research
M. A. Highland, DVM, DACVP, PhDc; USDA-ARS Animal Disease Research Unit

Control of Infectious Diseases
Don Knowles, DVM, Ph.D.; USDA-ARS Animal Disease Research Unit

Thursday and Friday Wool Council Meetings

State of Objective Measurement Industry
Angus McColl, Yoco-McColl Testing Laboratories

World Wool Market, 2017
Goetz Giebel, ASI Wool Consultant

Business in China
Kitty Gu, ASI Wool Consultant

Responsible Wool Standard Update
Lisa Surber, Ph.D., ASI Wool Consultant

Agriculture Marketing Service Report
Chris Dias, AMS Market Reporter

Friday Lamb Council and American Lamb Board Meeting

Food Service Trends and American Lamb
Mary Humann, American Lamb Board

Lamb Quality / Flavor Researcj
Karissa Maneotis, Colorado State University

Livestock Mandatory Reporting
Erica Sanko and USDA/AMS

Instrument Augmented Lamb Grading Status of the Industry
Willie Horne, Ph.D., USDA/AMS

Lamb Market: Situation and Outlook
James Robb, Director, Livestock Marketing Information Center

Friday Legislative Action Council Meeting

Best Practices and Federal Overview
Jim Richards, Cornerstone Government Affairs, Washington, D.C.

Friday Let’s Grow Committee Meeting

Leading Edge Sheep Producers
Tom Boyer (Utah) and Brandon Bitner (Utah)

Use of Electronic ID to Enhance Lamb Productivity & Value-Based Marketing
Reid Redden, Ph.D. Texas A&M AgriLife Extension and Brad Anderson, Mountain States Rosen

S.D. Post Weaning Lamb Performance Program
Dave Ollila, SDSU Extension and Jeff Held, Ph.D., SDSU Extension

Fine Wool Consortium
Ben Lehfeldt and Rusty Burgett, NSIP Program Director

Grass Based Pipestone in the Southeast
Shawn Hadley

Friday Board of Directors Informational Session

Veterinary Feed Directives for the Sheep Industry — How Did We Get Here? And What Do We Do Now?
Meg Oeller, DVM – Director, Office of Minor Use & Minor Species, FDA, Center for Veterinary Medicine
Watch the presentation video on ASI’s YouTube Channel at SheepUSA1

Farm to Feet
Kelly Nester – Nester Hosiery

Twizel, Inc.
John Fernsell – Twizel, Inc.

What is a brand?
John Bellina – Brand Juice

Political Discussion, or…What the heck happened???
Jim Richards – Cornerstone Government Affairs

Tri-Lamb Young Leaders
Brad Osguthorpe – Utah
Karissa Maneotis – Colorado
Katie Olagaray – Kansas/California
Ryan Mahoney – California

Friday and Saturday ASI Young Entrepreneurs SessionS

Crossbreeding to Improve Productivity
Dave Notter, Ph.D., Department of Animal and Poultry Sciences, Virginia Tech

Social Networking and Your Flock
Emily Buck, Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Transition Planning is Optional – Well, Kinda!!!
David Specht, Family Dynamics National Development Manager

Tri-lamb Young Leaders
Brad Osguthorpe – Utah
Katie Olagaray – Kansas
Kariss Maneotis – Colorado
Ryan Mahoney – California

Saturday Board of Directors Meeting

Conducting a proof of concept for differentiating the inherent differences in flavor that exists among American lamb using volatile flavor compound analysis.
Karissa Maneotis, Colorado State University

American Sheep Industry Incident Management (ie. Emergency Response)
Linda A. Detwiler, DVM

2017 Face of Farming and Ranching
Emily Buck, Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Responsible Animal Care
Rita Kourlis Samuelson, ASI Director of Wool Marketing

Responsible Wool Standard
Lisa Surber, Ph.D., ASI Raw Wool Service

National Sheep Industry Improvement Center Update
Steve Lee, NSIIC Executive Director

National Lamb Feeders Association Update
Bob Harlan, NLFA President

National Livestock Producers Association Update
Scott Stuart, NLPA Executive Director

Let’s Grow Committee Update
Susan Shultz, Let’s Grow Chair

 

Source: http://www.sheepusa.org/ResearchEducation_Presentations_2017Convention

 

3 Scottish Blackface Sheep Looking for a Home

I am moving from Coopersburg PA to Oregon and cannot take my 3 Scottish Blackface Sheep. They will be 3 years old in the spring and are in excellent health. Can you you help me find a good home for them? They are siblings, very friendly and gentle for scotties.

Thank you – Laurie Walsh-Rumsey

Contact info: lauriewalsh53@gmail.com

GSSB 2016 Festival Photos

Sheep
Sheep
Shepherd's Lead
Shepherd’s Lead
Shepherd's Lead
Shepherd’s Lead
Shepherd's Lead
Shepherd’s Lead
Jacob Sheep Show
Jacob Sheep Show
Jacob Sheep Show
Jacob Sheep Show
Fleece Show
Fleece Show
Sheep Shows
Sheep Shows
Sheep Shows
Sheep Shows
Sheep Shows
Sheep Shows
Shepherd's Lead
Shepherd’s Lead
Shepherd's Lead
Shepherd’s Lead
Shepherd's Lead
Shepherd’s Lead
Shepherd's Lead
Shepherd’s Lead
Gotland Breed Display
Gotland Breed Display
Vendor Displays
Vendor Displays
Junior Sheep Show
Junior Sheep Show
Sheep
Sheep
Gotland Sheep Show
Gotland Sheep Show
Sheep
Sheep
Vendor Displays
Vendor Displays

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2016 Livestock Conservancy Conference, Amherst MA Nov. 3-5

Registration Now Open
2016 Livestock Conservancy Conference

 Hampshire College, Amherst, MA
November 3 – 5, 2016

Thursday Evening Reception
Networking and Poster Session

Friday PreConference INTENSIVE Clinics

  • Creating and Marketing Value-Added Products with Rare Breeds
  • Introduction to Cattle Management
  • Breed Association – Routes to Success (Part I) The nuts and bolts of operating an association
  • Breed Association – Routes to Success (Part II) – Where’s the money and how can my association get some?
  • Mirco Dairying
  • Sheep Artificial Insemination

Conference Workshops
Shetland sheep: Soil Carbon Restoration Superheroes
Selecting Cattle for Success
Heritage Chicks in the Classroom
Semen Import Roundtable
American Guinea Hogs: Homestead Hog and Chef’s
Saving Rare Equine Breeds
Not Every Pig is a Breeder and Why
Seed Savers Integrated Management System
Milking Devon Cattle
Import Roundtable
The SVF Story
Practical Website and Facebook Marketing for the Busy Farmer and more!

Source: Livestock Conservancy

Cost of Baling Hay

Drovers published an article by Travis Meteer from the University of Illinois stating that every ton of hay contains approximately 40 pounds of N (nitrogen), 20 pounds of P (phosphorus) and 50 pounds of K (potassium). However, it is important to calculate N losses at about 75 percent, thus only about 10 pounds of N are returned to the soil. The values of P and K are accurate to what would be returned.

Fertilizer prices for Illinois published by USDA (May 12 report) are: N $0.40, P $0.34, K $0.29. Using current nutrient values, hay has a fertilizer value of $25.30 per dry ton. Assuming a 1,200-pound round bale is 15 percent moisture, the nutrient value per bale is $12.91.

If you are figuring what it costs to make hay on your farm, add mowing, raking and baling at $20.20 per bale (Machinery Cost Estimates, University of Illinois Extension, June 2015). As a result, a bale of hay sitting in the field costs $33.11.

Other costs would include removal of micronutrients, moving the bales from the field, some additional time and labor in handling the bales and the use of equipment to transport the hay. If yields are below average, nearly all costs increase. Hay storage can also be a substantial part of hay costs.

Source: cattlenetwork.com (from American Sheep Industry Weekly July 22, 2016)

Recording of ASU Mineral and Vitamin Webinar Available

Dan Morrical, Ph.D., professor of animal science at Iowa State University, discussed the appropriate balance of minerals and vitamins in sheep flocks with nearly 150 attendees during this week’s Let’s Grow webinar. Refining Our Nutrition Program to Meet the Mineral and Vitamin Needs of Our Sheep, was designed to help producers understand the current problems that occur when sheep are not appropriately supplemented.

Attendee comments were very positive stating, “Great information, good use of my time. The session was just the right amount of time. The instructor was very knowledgeable. I can’t wait to attend more of these webinars.” and “This is a difficult and confusing topic that was explained and presented in a way that made sense. I learned many new things tonight. Thank you.”

Those unable to attend the webinar can access a recording of the event as well as view the slides that were used for the presentation by visiting the Resources section of www.growourflock.org.

Congrats to Chris Posbergh

Posbergh Earns Sheep Heritage Foundation Scholarship

Taking on one of the hottest topics in the sheep industry paid off for Chris Posbergh when he was named the winner of the 2016 Sheep Heritage Foundation scholarship in mid-July. The scholarship award is $3,000 this year.

A Ph.D. student at New York’s Cornell University – where he earned a bachelor’s degree in animal science in May 2015 – Posbergh’s research project is Increasing Efficiency in Sheep Production Using Genetics. Specifically, he has two objectives: to identify genetic variants responsible for mature body size and to identify genetic variants responsible for out of season lambing.

In the first part of his study, Posbergh hopes, “DNA markers can be developed to allow breeders to control selection for mature size earlier in a sheep’s life.” But it’s the second part of his project that could play an important role in the future of the sheep industry.

“By analyzing lambing records from flocks selecting for aseasonality, we identified individuals that consistently lambed or failed to lamb out of season,” he wrote in his scholarship application. “The long-term goal is to develop genetic markers that breeders can use to select for ewes that are more likely to lamb out of season. Both of these objectives work toward increasing the efficiency of the industry by reducing maintenance costs associated with large size and increasing the productivity of ewes through year-round lambing.”

A New Jersey native, his first exposure to the sheep industry came when his dad brought home a bottle lamb from work. Posbergh went on to show sheep through 4-H and has counted Dorset and Romneys in his personal flock. He took the reigns as president of the American Romney Breeders Association in August of 2015. Most of his research work with sheep has focused on animal genetics. He’s also interested in natural wool colors and hopes to incorporate a study of color into future work.

Source: American Sheep Industry Weekly July 22, 2016

Let’s Grow Webinar Talks Sheep Nutrition – July 19

Iowa State University Animal Science Professor Dan Morrical, Ph.D., will join host Jay Parson, Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln, to present the next Let’s Grow Webinar – Refining Our Nutrition Program to Meet the Mineral and Vitamin Needs of our Sheep Flocks – on July 19 at 7 p.m. CDT.

Minerals and vitamins are not required in large amounts but inadequate quantities or imbalances of these nutrients can create quite a problem in flocks. Excess copper is probably the primary toxicity seen in sheep flocks. Increased molybdenum and sulfur can both reduce copper absorption and is an example of how minerals interact to impact sheep. This program is aimed at helping producers understand the current problems that happen when sheep are not appropriately supplemented. Additionally, there will be a focus on reviewing mineral tags and understanding what they say and how they need to be fed. The last portion of the presentation will focus on how to make modifications to existing diets to improve the production of flocks.

This webinar is being presented as a follow up to the well-received program given in 2015 by Robert Van Saun, Ph.D., Dietary Supplements: A Necessity or Folly. That webinar is available on the Let’s Grow webpage at www.sheepusa.org/Growourflock_Resources_EducationalWebinars.

Register to participate in the July program by going to https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8004453821931145730.

Purina Recalls Medicated Sheep Feed Distributed to PA and OH Due to Elevated Copper Level

Purina Animal Nutrition Initiates Recall of Purina Medicated Sheep Feed due to Elevated Copper Level
06/28/2016
Purina Animal Nutrition Initiates Recall of Purina Medicated Sheep Feed due to Elevated Copper Level – Purina Animal Nutrition LLC is voluntarily recalling one lot of Purina® Lamb Grower® B30 Medicated Sheep Feed packaged in the green and white generic paper LAND O LAKES® Feed bags.

The single lot number is:

Formula No. L329
Item No. 1850500-206
Description – Purina® Lamb Grower® B30 Medicated
Lot No. 6MAY06WCH2

The product was distributed in Ohio and Pennsylvania during the dates of May 12, 2016 through June 22, 2016.

Visit our home page at http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/default.htm