Import Alert: Sheep and Goat Embryos/Oocytes Now Eligible for Import from the U.K.

Issuance Date: December 1, 2022

Effective Date: Immediately     

 

Effective immediately, sheep and goat in-vivo embryos and oocytes from the United Kingdom of Great Britain (England, Scotland, Wales) and Northern Ireland will be eligible for import into the United States. Importation of such commodities is only permitted for direct transfer to recipient females in U.S. flocks or herds listed in the National Scrapie Database, or to an Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-approved embryo storage facility where they may be kept until transfer to the aforementioned recipient females.

The importer of record must meet post-entry requirements pertaining to further distribution of imported embryos/oocytes, identification of any progeny derived from the imported embryos/oocytes, and recordkeeping. The import requirements and post-entry requirements are available on the Live Animal Imports website.

APHIS requires an import permit for importation of sheep and goat embryos/oocytes from the United Kingdom. The shipment must also be accompanied by a health certificate endorsed by the competent authority of the exporting region (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs in Great Britain; Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs in Northern Ireland). Examples of the required health certificates can be found on the APHIS website.

For any questions regarding import of sheep and goat embryos/oocytes from the United Kingdom for transfer to eligible U.S. recipient females, please contact Dr. Mary Kate Anderson at (301)851-3300, Option 2 or e-mail LAIE@usda.gov.

For importation of sheep and goat embryos/oocytes for any purpose other than reproduction, please consult the Veterinary Services Permitting Assistant (VSPA) to determine the relevant import requirements.

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Please share the following link with others who may be interested in these updates. Click here to subscribe to the VS Animal Health Stakeholder Registry. This link will also allow you to change or cancel your subscriptions.

Virtual Workshop: NSIP Getting Your Genetics Right – Converting Performance Records Into Decision-making Tools

Check out the latest learning opportunity on 11/30/22 from the University of Rhode Island!

Topics will include controlling GI parasites, genetic selection and your breeding program, and use of estimated breeding values (“EBV”), followed by a Q & A with speakers

Sheep and Goat Producers:

Announcing a 2022 Northeast National Sheep Improvement Program (NSIP) Virtual WorkshopGetting Your Genetics Right: Converting Performance Records Into Decision-making Tools.
 
View the program flyer for more information.  The workshop is being offered once November 30th 2022, 8-10pm Eastern Standard Time. The workshop is free, however pre-registration is required as space is limited.  
 
 
Elizabeth Kass, Research Assistant

URI, Dept. Fisheries, Animal and Veterinary Science (FAVS)

55 Peckham Farm

Kingston, RI  02881

(401) 874-2249

 

WeatherWool – Made In USA – News & Open House

 

WeatherWool News, October 2022

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MidWeight Lynx Pattern Hooded Jackets in stock

This Sunday, 30 October, we have an OPEN HOUSE. On hand will be Anoraks, CPOs, Hooded Jackets, All Around Jackets and some other items.

We are cranking up production now on more Anoraks, All-Around Jackets, Women’s Blanket Coats, Peacoats, Mouton Jackets, Blankets and North Maine Double Coats. And American Woolen, our Mill in Connecticut, should soon complete work on some of our FullWeight Black and Drab Fabrics.

Open House runs from 11AM until whenever. Join us for brunch, or lunch, or later for pizza. You can also visit by appointment. Given this is a Sunday, the day before Halloween, we’ll also have lots of chocolate bars and football on TV.

WeatherWool Headquarters is our home in the Jersey ‘burbs of NYC.
South Orange is, according to local legend, America’s first suburb.

144 Ralston Avenue, South Orange, New Jersey

Yellow house with the American Flag

10 miles West of New York City
10 miles from Newark Liberty International Airport
Around the corner from Seton Hall University
Convenient to many highways
Short walk to NYC/NJ Transit Trains and Buses

If you are coming, it will help if you let us know, but it’s not necessary.

WeatherWool.com

831-704-1776 (831 – July 4th – 1776) or Ralph@WeatherWool.com

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Welcome to the Home of WeatherWool, 144 Ralston Avenue in South Orange, NEW JERSEY!

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Rutgers Extension learning opportunity: Barber Pole Worm/Deworming Selection event

Greetings, Salem County Sheep Group and Garden State Sheep Breeders!
If you have not already attended or would like to attend again, and have sheep, goats, alpacas, or llamas, please come to my Barber Pole Worm Management and Deworming Selection/Scheduling Session on October 27th, at 6 pm in the Salem County Office Building at 51 Cheney Road, Woodstown, NJ. 
Feel free to bring your dinner.
Please RSVP so I know how many workbook packets to print.
This class is designed for beginner producers who are new to dealing with Barber Pole or need assistance with dealing with Barber pole management.
Feel free to share with other producers in neighboring counties here in the Southern area who would like to attend.

Melissa A. Bravo, M.S. Agronomy | Assistant Professor, County Agent III

 

Rutgers Cooperative Extension |Agriculture & Natural Resources

 

Salem County, Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station
Suite 1 51 Cheney Rd. Woodstown, NJ 08098-9982

 

856.340.6582 work cell | 856.769.0090 office

 

Crop Talk Website: https://sites.rutgers.edu/salem-county-crop-talk/

Glad to meet you! Please evaluate our first meeting: https://njaes.rutgers.edu/eval/

Preparing sheep and goats for breeding season

The following very timely article comes from Michael Metzger, Michigan State University/ Jackson County Extension’s Small Ruminant Instructor:

As fall approaches, so does the normal breeding season for most sheep and goats. Consideration for things like parasite count, hoof health, body condition scoring, and overall health of breeding stock should be evaluated prior to breeding.

Ram.
Photo by Michael Metzger, MSU Extension.

Internal Parasites 

All breeding stock, males and females, should be checked for internal parasites. The FAMACHA scoring system allows small ruminant producers to make deworming decisions based on an estimate of the level of anemia in sheep. Animals that are showing a high FAMACHA score (over 3) or have a high fecal egg count should be treated for internal parasites before breeding season. Managing internal parasites is an important management practice. Problems with parasites, especially gastrointestinal parasites, can cause irreversible damage and even death to the animal.

Hoof Care 

Animals with long or damaged hooves should be trimmed before breeding season as well. You should inspect the animals’ hoofs and using a knife or hoof trimmers, remove any dirt, mud, manure, or stones from the hoof walls and then trim accordingly. A strong, rotten smell is often an indication of hoof rot, which can be treated by using a commercially available anti-fungal product.

Body Condition Scoring 

Body Condition Score, or BCS, is a system used to evaluate the fleshiness of the animal. BCS’s for sheep and goats are given on a scale from 1 to 5 with one being emaciated and five being obese. In order to properly access the BCS of goats and sheep they must be handled. BCS is done by feeling the amount of fat cover over the ribs, loin, and backbone. Michigan State University Extension recommends that does and ewes should be in the 2.5 to 3 range at the beginning of breeding season. Evaluating your breeding females to make sure they are in good condition for breeding is an important first step. Does and ewes that are in good condition, not too thin or too fat, are more likely to conceive and have kids or lambs in the spring. Animals that are too thin will not conceive, have a low twinning rate, and potentially low weaning weights. Animals that are over conditioned have an increased risk of metabolic issues such as pregnancy toxemia during their pregnancy. Over-conditioned animals also have an increased risk of dystocia during kidding or lambing. 

If breeding females are below BCS 2.5, then they should be placed on good quality pasture or supplemented with grain at one half to one pound of supplement per head per day for at least two weeks before breeding. Having the does or ewes on a diet where they are increasing weight will increase the odds of having twins or triplets. This is also referred to as flushing. Flushing will not be effective on over conditioned animals. 

The health of the does or ewes is important going into breeding season, but so is the health of the buck or ram. It is his job to make sure the females get bred. BCS of the buck or ram should be a little heavier than the females, 3 to 3.5. Many bucks and rams will focus mainly on breeding during the breeding season and will lose body condition as a result. Some producers may also have a breeding soundness exam done on their buck or ram to make sure they are producing viable semen. An infertile or low fertility buck/ram can be the reason for a lower number of females becoming pregnant. 

 

Body Conditioning Scoring

Taking the appropriate steps this fall as breeding season approaches will lead to a successful breeding season and put the producer on a path to a successful kidding/lambing season next spring. 

WeatherWool – Made In USA – News & Open House

News from Garden State Sheep Breeders members Ralph and Debby DiMeo:

weatherwool12 MADE IN USA use for Label
Some news for the first day of Fall:

WeatherWool will be on two television shows tonight, both on The History Channel. At 8PM Eastern is THE MOUNTAIN MEN. A few of the Mountain Men, plus camera crew, wear WeatherWool, although we never know in advance what will actually be on TV. Following Mountain Men is the Season Finale of ALONE: FROZEN, and one of the remaining contestants, Callie Russell, is wearing our Anorak. It makes me smile that all of the people on these shows will also receive this email!

We just completed work on our Hooded Jackets in MidWeight Lynx Pattern, and these are available. We plan to make the Hooded Jackets in other Fabrics, but that is months down the road.

Also in stock are MidWeight Anoraks and MidWeight CPO Shirts.

We’re making some Blankets in our MidWeight and FullWeight Lynx Fabrics now, with other Fabrics to follow. If you want a Blanket, please get in touch.

Production of our Fabric is moving along very well, and we will have more Fabric soon. There are a LOT of garments we want to make. But with the surge of demand for MADE IN USA, the tailors may be very busy.

This Sunday, September 25, we have an OPEN HOUSE, and we’ll have Anoraks, CPOs, Hooded Jackets and some other items on hand.

If you’re anywhere near the NYC area, we hope you can make it on Sunday (25 September). Open House runs from 11AM until whenever. Join us for brunch, or lunch, or later for pizza. You can also visit by appointment.

WeatherWool Headquarters is our home in the Jersey ‘burbs of NYC.
South Orange is, according to local legend, America’s first suburb.

144 Ralston Avenue, South Orange, New Jersey

Yellow house with the American Flag

10 miles West of New York City
10 miles from Newark Liberty International Airport
Around the corner from Seton Hall University
Convenient to many highways
Short walk to NYC/NJ Transit Trains and Buses

If you are coming, it will help if you let us know, but it’s not necessary.

WeatherWool.com

831-704-1776 (831 – July 4th – 1776) or Ralph@WeatherWool.com

Welcome to the Home of WeatherWool, 144 Ralston Avenue in South Orange, NEW JERSEY!

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The CPO Shirt in Lynx Pattern is a great choice for people with pets!

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Condé Nast Traveler Highlights Wool

From ASI Weekly, the American Sheep Industry’s newsletter dated September 2, 2022 comes the following item of interest:

This week, Condé Nast Traveler offered online readers a look at wool clothing they should add to their travel wardrobes.

 

“When you think of wool clothing, your mind probably goes to chunky socks, stiff slacks, or expensive cashmere that you’re afraid to ruin. But a recent push toward sustainable fashion has put wool under a new spotlight, with more brands using the fabric to create clothes that are both functional and fashionable, and wearable in all seasons.

 

“But what makes wool the perfect fabric for travel clothes? Some may say that wool is too thick and itchy to be comfortable, but wool comes in many forms. Merino wool – for instance – is an ultra-fine and super soft wool that’s lightweight and breathable, creating clothes that are great for adventure travel and city trips in both cold and warm climates. Wool is also odor-resistant – the absorbent fibers in the fabric wick away sweat and lock in odor – so even if you sweat through a wool shirt during a hike in the Adirondacks or a summer day in Paris, once it dries it will be odorless and ready to wear without washing, making it easier to pack light. Wool is also wrinkle-proof, so opting for a wool T-shirt or shift dress on your travels means that you’ll look fresh and polished, even if you forgot to pack a steamer.

 

“While adventure and performance clothing brands have been harnessing the power of wool for decades, recent fashion-forwards brands like Babaa and Nadaam are putting a stylish spin on the material, creating everything from shoes to dresses – and of course, sweaters – that are perfect for today’s travelers.”

 

Click Here to find out which eight pieces of clothing the magazine recommended for frequent travelers.

 

Source: Condé Nast Traveler

Rutgers Cooperative Extension message: Nitrates In Forage

GSSB member CB Katzenbach is sharing the following message from NJ extension agent Mike Westendorf regarding the current drought and the potential health problems for all ruminants that may be caused by increasing nitrogen levels in pastures & forage. It’s very timely as most of the area is in moderate to severe drought:

With a large portion of New Jersey receiving abnormally low rainfall during the 2022 growing season there is concern about excess nitrate accumulation in forages.  Excess nitrate in forages can result in sickness and death in cows, sheep, goats, and other ruminants consuming these feeds.

It might be helpful to understand the danger forages containing higher levels of nitrates pose to animal health.  Nitrate is a common form of nitrogen found in the soil, which is taken up by plants and converted to protein in the plant.  Under normal growing conditions, nitrates do not accumulate in the plant. However, when plants are stressed with dry growing conditions, photosynthetic and metabolic processes are inhibited and the potential for accumulation of nitrates increases.

Utilizing drought-affected crops for livestock feed is a common practice; however, producers must consider the potential risks of nitrate toxicity.   Harvesting forage crops that are more susceptible should be done so that the lower segments of the plant stalk, which has the highest chance of storing nitrates, are not harvested.

Ruminant animals can convert nitrate to nitrite and ammonia in the rumen and detoxify nitrate.  When the level of nitrate builds up in the rumen due to higher levels in the diet rumen microbes cannot convert all the nitrate present to ammonia because the conversion of nitrate to nitrite occurs more quickly than the conversion of nitrite to ammonia. If levels of nitrate are great enough, nitrite will accumulate in the rumen and be absorbed through the wall of the rumen into the blood supply.  Nitrite can combine with hemoglobin in the blood and convert it to methemoglobin, which will carry very little oxygen to the tissues.  The first sign of nitrate poisoning is often dead animals.  Other physical signs of nitrate poisoning include difficult breathing, muscle incoordination and staggering, diarrhea and frequent urination, heavy salivation, cyanosis, and collapse.  Sublethal poisoning may result in a loss of appetite, lowered milk production, slow growth, abortions, and poor fertility.

A couple precautions about feeding drought affected forages containing high levels of nitrates:

  1. Order of feeding priority: Silage > Hay > Grazing > Green chop. Ensiling will destroy 40-60% of nitrates. Therefore, silage crops will have the lowest levels of nitrates due to bacterial destruction. Producing forage for dry hay does not destroy nitrates. Green chop will be the riskiest to feed. If nitrate levels are high enough, ensiling may be the only way to salvage the forage.
  2. Never feed forage containing greater than 1.5% nitrate.  Ruminants, especially cows, can be fed forage containing <1.5% nitrate if slowly adapted and provided the forage is only a portion of the diet.
  3. If contamination is suspected or if animals are showing signs of toxicity, the best option is to call a veterinarian, they will be able to provide veterinary treatment.

The attached factsheet and the link to a Plant and Pest Advisory https://plant-pest-advisory.rutgers.edu/feeding-nitrate-containing-forages/ article will give you more information if you get questions.

Educational material will be provided, and meetings are planned to help with questions. The State Department of Agriculture is planning a testing program through their feed laboratory to assist producers in managing affected forages.

Contact Meredith Melendez, Agricultural Agent II and Associate Professor, Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Mercer County, by calling 609-989-6830 for additional  information.

Livestock Conservancy: 2022 Microgrants submissions accepted through 8/19/22

Microgrants 2022 banner

 

Applications for the Heritage Livestock Microgrants Program are open! Submit your application online today at
https://livestockconservancy.org/resources/micro-grant-program/

The Livestock Conservancy Microgrants Program continues to put funding into the hands of our most important conservation partners – those stewarding genetic treasures for the security of tomorrow’s food and fiber systems. The Livestock Conservancy awards more than $22,000 annually in $500-$2,000 Microgrants to farmers, ranchers, shepherds, and breed organizations keeping endangered breeds of livestock and poultry from going extinct across the country.

“Small financial awards can make a big difference for heritage breeders,” said Dr. Alison Martin, Livestock Conservancy Executive Director. “These strategic investments are selected by a panel of judges as excellent examples of livestock conservation in action across the United States.”

Applications for $500 to $2,000 grants may be submitted for one of four categories:

  • National Microgrants: Residents and organizations of the U.S. working with livestock and poultry breeds listed on the Conservation Priority List. Support will be provided through this competitive program for a variety of farm-related operations, including, but not limited to, livestock, poultry, processing, milk, meat and egg production and sales, agritourism, wool milling, promotions and marketing. Awards typically range from $500 – $2,000, at the discretion of The Livestock Conservancy. New this year, is a rabbit-related Microgrant sponsored by KW Cages.
  • Youth Microgrants: This U.S.-based program provides funding for youth projects for individuals 8-18 years of age and are actively working with breeds listed on the Conservation Priority List. Support will be provided through this competitive program for a variety of farm-related operations, including, but not limited to, livestock, poultry, processing, milk, meat and egg production and sales, agritourism, wool milling, promotions and marketing. Awards typically range from $500 – $2,000, at the discretion of The Livestock Conservancy.
  • Premier 1 Microgrant: This program provides funding for residents and organizations of the U.S. working with livestock and poultry breeds listed on The Livestock Conservancy’s Conservation Priority List. Support will include fencing products available through Premier 1 Supplies and other project related needs. Awards typically range from $500 – $2,000, at the discretion of The Livestock Conservancy.
  • NEW Breed Association Microgrants: This program is open to U.S. based associations and clubs working with breeds listed on The Livestock Conservancy’s Conservation Priority List. Funds are intended to help associations and clubs improve services for their membership and conservation of their breeds. Applicant organizations must be in existence for a minimum of three years, meet their state’s requirements for operating as a business or corporation, be incorporated (no Sole Proprietors or Partnerships), and have board approval to pursue the project. Suitable expenditures of Breed Association Microgrants include, but are not limited to, marketing materials, website improvements, gene banking, software, educational events, developing strategic plans, DNA studies, flock or herd rescues.

Complete applications must be submitted no later than August 19, 2022 and must include a detailed plan for the use of the grant funds, such as a list of deliverables that can be validated, a clear timeline for achieving proposed goals, a detailed project budget for matching funds or other resources, how the project will impact the breed and other producers, and how you will evaluate the success of your project. Applications should also include two letters of recommendation from a professional relationship or educator; if applicant is under the age of 18, a letter of support from a parent or guardian is also required

Find more information about the Microgrant program as well as a video about how write a better grant application at  https://livestockconservancy.org/resources/micro-grant-program/

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The Livestock Conservancy is a national non-profit membership organization working to protect more than 150 breeds of livestock and poultry from extinction.

Why is genetic diversity important?

Like all ecological systems, agriculture depends on genetic diversity to adapt to an ever-changing environment. Genetic diversity in domestic animals is revealed in distinct breeds, each with different characteristics and uses. Traditional, historic breeds retain essential attributes for survival and self-sufficiency – fertility, foraging ability, longevity, maternal instincts and resistance to disease and parasites. As agriculture changes, this genetic diversity may be needed for a broad range of uses and opportunities. Once lost, genetic diversity is gone forever.

What are Heritage Breeds?

Heritage breeds are livestock and poultry breeds raised by our forefathers. These breeds were carefully selected and bred over time to develop traits that made them well-adapted to the local environment and they thrived under farming practices and cultural conditions that are very different from those found in modern agriculture.

Heritage animals once roamed America’s pastoral landscape, but today these breeds are in danger of extinction. Modern agriculture has changed, causing many of these breeds to fall out of favor. Heritage breeds store a wealth of genetic resources that are important for our future and the future of our agricultural food system.

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Contact: Brittany Sweeney
bsweeney@livestockconservancy.org
(919) 542-5704
PO Box 477, Pittsboro, NC 27312

 

 

  

Barclay Farmstead – Seeking Sheep For Living History Day Shearing Demo

The Friends of Barclay Homestead, a non-profit, volunteer organization founded in 1975 to promote the historic, educational, and interpretive activities of the Barclay Farmstead in Cherry Hill, NJ, is in need of sheep for their Living History Day demonstration of shearing on October 9, 2022.

There will be related wool spinning, weaving, and children’s crafts to make history come alive for visitors.

If you can bring a sheep (or two) and/or help shear, please contact Beth at 856-745-7519, or email her at bethilyssabecker@verizon.net.

 

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