Apply Now For 2019 ASI Sheep Heritage Scholarship

Through the American Sheep Industry Association, the Sheep Heritage Foundation Memorial Scholarship in the amount of $3,000 is being made available for sheep-related graduate studies.

The scholarship is for the advancement of the American sheep industry through financial support of a graduate-level (M.S. or Ph.D.) student who is attending a school in the United States.

Requirements for applying include:

  • Be a graduate student involved in sheep and/or wool research in such areas as animal science, agriculture economics or veterinary medicine with proof of graduate school acceptance.
  • Complete an application.
  • Present two letters of reference.

Click Here to download the application or obtain a copy by contacting ASI, Attn: Memorial Scholarship, 9785 Maroon Circle, Suite 360, Englewood, CO 80112-2692, by calling 303-771-3500 ext. 107, or by emailing angela@sheepusa.org.

Applications must be received in the office by May 31 and the 2019 scholarship recipient will be announced in June or July.

General Meeting 20 April 2019 at 11:30AM

Hi All,

Well spring is in the air and that means it’s time to plan our GSSB Spring General Meeting. This year’s Spring General Meeting will take place on 20 Apr 19 @ 11:30 AM. The meeting will be hosted by Bob and Diane May and their family at Swayze Inn Farm in Hope, NJ. We will have our general meeting, a farm tour and a session on participating in a breed up program including the use of CIDRs to cycle ewes, laparoscopic artificial insemination techniques and pregnancy check via ultrasound. As always dress comfortable and wear farm clothes. Meeting will be rain or shine and lunch will be served.

Our general meeting agenda will include an update on our Youth Ambassador program, an update from this year’s ASI meeting as well as a report out on last year’s festival along with the plans for this year which is our 25th annual festival. For members in attendance we will have our ever popular door prize drawings at the end of the meeting.

The May’s Swayze Inn Farm is located in Warren County, NJ and the address can be found in the Member’s Directory.  Bob’s email address is newjerseyjacobs@yahoo.com and the farm’s website is SwayzeInnFarm.com.

This is an opportunity to meet the new slate of officers and interact with other regional shepherds in addition to learning about some breeding practices and experiences from seasoned breeders and a veterinarian who is a reproduction specialist.

We would like to get a head count for lunch so please let Bob know if you will be attending as well if you may have any food allergies.

Look forward to seeing you at the meeting.

Cheers,

Kevin M.

Hidden Powers of a Sheep

Nice article in the winter issue of Craftsman Quarterly:

https://craftsmanship.net/the-hidden-powers-of-a-sheep/

Judith Schwartz writes about the people who are trying to turn around the near disappearance of American wool processing within the United States.  Ecological reasons for keeping sheep (they contribute to carbon sequestrian if pastures are managed correctly), natural dying,  and efforts to make  American wool products competitive (based on value not on cost) with Chinese products made from American wool.

Experience Wool Now on YouTube

The American Wool Council has provided fans of the all-natural fiber with a new way to Experience Wool through the creation of a YouTube page. The page currently hosts three videos produced by Brand Juice in the past year to market American wool to a wide variety of consumers.

The videos were shown on multiple occasions during the American Sheep Industry Association Annual Convention last month in New Orleans, and can now be shared from the YouTube page by producers looking to promote American wool and its many benefits.

In The Luxurious Fiber, a narrator explains that the “Fabric designers choose first to achieve pure elegance, absolute luxury and unmatched style” is American wool.

The High Performance Fiber is aimed at more demanding users and offers, “There’s one time-tested, expedition-proven material you can count on. One fabric for four seasons. Experience the confidence of American wool.”

Natural and Sustainable promotes what might be the fiber’s greatest trait. “What this miracle becomes is infinitely remarkable, versatile, beautiful and in the end, sustainable.”

If you haven’t seen them yet, check out the videos. Share them with your friends, family and clients, and help the American Wool Council in promoting this natural, renewable, sustainable fiber that is perfect for any occasion in any season.

Access the YouTube Channel:   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFhONGmym_OM8ZWxPqw9Fag

For more information on American wool, visit AmericanWool.org or follow Experience Wool on Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter.

Source: ASI Weekly February 8, 2019

 

‘Shop local’ drives sales of American-made yarn

Source:  https://www.morningagclips.com/shop-local-drives-sales-of-american-made-yarn/

 

Mixed Breed Sheep for Sale Due to Death in Family

Attached please find some pictures of some mixed breed sheep that are for sale.  A friend of ours mother passed away recently and they are unable to care for the sheep.  They are asking $100 to $150, negotiable .  If interested you can either contact me (Tracy) 908-887-2630  or Lonnie King who is the contact for selling them at 1-610-745-3318.
Tracy Smith
bdtsmith@gmail.com
home- 689-1974
cell- 887-2630

Livestock Conservancy Introduces New Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em Wool Program

The Livestock Conservancy is hoping to preserve endangered sheep with its Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em program that encourages fiber artists to work with wool from rare sheep breeds.

Leicester Longwool

Genetic diversity is just one reason to preserve heritage sheep. Heritage breeds have survived through the ages because they are naturally hardy. Of particular interest to fiber artists are the different types of wool that each breed produces. Some have a softer wool that’s excellent for garments, while others have wool that’s more suited to making rugs. Some have white wool that takes well to dyes, while others come in a wide variety of natural colors and patterns.

The goal of Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em is to put fiber artists in contact with shepherds who produce wool from sheep on The Livestock Conservancy’s list of endangered livestock. When fiber artists register, they will receive a passport that includes a page of information for each breed. Each page will also include space to put a stamp after they purchase wool from a particular breed. There will be a Facebook group and a Ravelry group where members can share pictures of their projects. As fiber artists work their way through the breeds, they will receive prizes for completing projects and reaching various landmarks.

In addition to encouraging fiber artists to try rare wools, the program will also educate shepherds about how to prepare their wool for sale to fiber artists. By helping shepherds market their wool, they will become more financially stable, which helps ensure the future of the sheep.

When shepherds sell raw fleece from rare breeds directly to consumers, they can earn an average of $16 per pound on Etsy.  Fiber can also be sold to fiber artists at fiber festivals that are held around the country. By turning wool into roving, it can be sold to hand spinners or felters for an average of $44 per pound on Etsy, and if they take the extra step of having it spun into yarn, it averages $80 per pound.

More information about the Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em  Challenge or about sheep breeds on the Conservation Priority List are available on the Livestock Conservancy website.

Source: ASI Weekly September 7, 2018

Breed Display Exhibitors Finalized with 2 New Breeds

This year we will have 2 breeds that haven’t been displayed at our Festival in prior years: Scottish Blackface and Valais Blacknose!

The Valais Blacknose is new to the US and the sheep on display (courtesy of Stone Manor Farm) is the 1st in NJ!  Freddie is an F1 wether (50% Scottish Blackface, 50% Valais Blacknose) born this year and part of the Breed Up program in the US.  Scottish Blackface sheep are first preference for use in the program as they were one of the breeds used originally to develop the Valais Blacknose (Leister Longwool and Lincoln are 2nd and 3rd preference breeds for the program).   Since animals can’t be imported to the US, semen from Blacknose sheep in other countries (Europe) is used on US Scottish Blackface ewes to produce a  hybrid.  After 5 generations the resulting sheep are 97% Valais Blacknose.

F1 (50% Valais)
F2 (75% Valais)
F3 (88% Valais)
F4 (94% Valais)
F5 (97% Valais)

 

Valais Blacknose Sheep Introduced in North America 

 

 

Youth Ambassador Program

The Garden State Sheep Breeders organization is proud to announce the introduction of the Garden State Sheep Breeders Youth Ambassador Program. Part of our  mission as stewards of the sheep community is to develop and grow our sheep leaders of tomorrow. The program’s goal is to empower the selected candidate with the knowledge, skills and aspirations necessary to develop them into an effective advocate for the Garden State Sheep Breeders. The program will seek to strengthen and expand upon the chosen candidate’s leadership abilities so that they may serve as a positive role model while promoting sheep, build meaningful relationships and support the sheep industry.

For details and an application see the Youth Ambassador Program page.